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HIV-Positive Airman in Kansas Sentenced to 8 Years

 

 

Tech Sergeant David Gutierrez, an HIV-positive airman at McConnell Air Force Base in Kansas, was found guilty and sentenced to eight years in military prison, The Associated Press (AP) reports. Gutierrez was accused of having unprotected sex with multiple partners without telling them he was HIV positive. A court martial convicted him on seven counts of aggravated assault and violating his commander’s order to notify sexual partners about his HIV status and to use condoms. Gutierrez was also convicted of indecent acts for having sex in front of others and eight counts of adultery. He originally faced 53 years in prison.

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Craigslist was a hit list

 

All four of the corpses found near a Long Island beach in December were young prostitutes who advertised their services on the Internet and were likely slain by a serial killer, authorities said yesterday.

After identifying one of the bodies as a Maine hooker last week, officials revealed that the three other skeletons found wrapped in burlap bags at Gilgo Beach were all Craigslist escorts who were killed shortly after meeting their slayer for sexual trysts.

Using DNA evidence, the victims were identified as Maureen Brainard-Barnes, 25, of Norwich, Conn.; Amber Lynn Costello, 27, of North Babylon; and Melissa Barthelemy, 24, of Buffalo.

Megan Waterman, 22, of Maine, was identified last week.

The killer's last known victim, Costello, went missing from North Babylon only five months ago on Sept. 2. Waterman was last seen at a Hauppauge Holiday Inn on June 6 of last year, Barthelemy went missing from The Bronx on July 12, 2009, and Brainard-Barnes vanished from Manhattan in July 2007.

"I think it fits within the known definition of what a serial killer would be," said Suffolk County District Attorney Thomas Spota, adding that more than one culprit could be involved.

Barthelemy, who moved from Buffalo to New York to become a stripper and prostitute, was reported missing on July 18, 2009. The NYPD confirmed that her mother and sister received calls from her daughter's cellphone just days after she went missing.

"Do you know what your sister does for a living?" the male caller asked, according to Barthelemy's mother. "Your sister's a whore, don't be like your sister."

Barthelemy's mother said her daughter first traveled to New York with her rapper boyfriend and decided to stay. She promised she would use the money earned from her stripping and prostitution to one day return to Buffalo.

Waterman traveled to Hauppauge last June with her boyfriend and pimp, Akeem Cruz, 20, of Brooklyn, and vanished after leaving the hotel. Cruz is currently in prison in Maine on a drug rap.

Norwich cops said that Brainard-Barnes left her Connecticut home for New York City on July 12, 2007, and has not been heard from since.

Originally published by SELIM ALGAR and JOHN DOYLE.

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"Sexting" May Lead to Criminal Consequences

December 05, 2010 /24-7PressRelease/ -- The latest gossip, according to RadarOnline, is that the Tony Parker and Eva Longoria-Parker divorce stemmed from a lengthy "sexting" relationship Tony had with a former teammate's wife, Erin Barry. It is likely that Parker will join the ranks of other celebrities, such as Tiger Woods and Brett Favre, who have been enveloped in drama-filled sexting scandals.

Sexting, by all practical evaluations, has gained mainstream attention with these high-profile incidents. "Sexting" is the texting of sexually explicit or scandalous messages and pictures. For many seeking to cheat on a spouse or significant other, sexting provides a discreet way to communicate with another person.

While the internal conflict caused by sexting in these relationships is great, as evidenced by the Parker-Longoria and Woods-Nordegren divorces, another large concern regarding sexting should be the legal consequences for sexting. Unknowingly opening a sexually explicit photo from an underage woman or man can lead to child pornography charges. Sexting a non-consenting person may lead to harassment allegations. These are just two examples of how sexting can create criminal charges.

The legal implications of explicit sexting may also entrap teens. According to a 2009 survey by the National Campaign to Support Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, 20 percent of teens admit to sexting.

Prosecutors Use Texts in Criminal Prosecution

When a person is suspected of criminal activity, North Carolina police may seek a search warrant. Cell phones and cell phone records can often provide police with a wealth of information about a suspect, including evidence to be used in a criminal prosecution.

While those who send or receive "sext" messages often believe that their communications are private, if the police have suspicion that illegal acts are occurring, a search warrant may permit the police to search the phone and phone records.

Throughout the country, suspects often learn the hard way that text messages can be used in criminal prosecutions for sex crimes. According to the North Carolina News & Observer, the following examples are just a handful of the hundreds of cases throughout the U.S. that involve sexting:
- An 18-year-old man was convicted of distributing obscene materials in Iowa when he sent a 14-year-old girl a picture of his genitals.
- An 18-year-old man was charged with distributing child pornography after he sent a nude photo of his 16-year old girlfriend to dozens of people.
- A 14-year old girl was charged with possession and distribution of child pornography in New Jersey after posting sexually explicit photos on MySpace.
Anyone who sends or receives sexually explicit photos or messages from an underage teen, has reason to be concerned. A child pornography charge can lead to a lifetime on the sex offender registry, in addition to jail time, fines and serious reputation damage.

Sexting is a dangerous gamble. With the advancements of modern technology, it is not known how far beyond the intended recipient a text message will go. Tony Parker, Tiger Woods and Brett Favre are only celebrity examples of the reputation damage sexting can cause. In all circumstances, it is urged that sexting be avoided because of the large criminal consequences that may be triggered after one single explicit text message.

Contact a Criminal Defense Attorney

If you have been arrested for a sex crime as a result of explicit text messages or social networking posts, contact a skilled Raleigh criminal defense attorney . A criminal defense lawyer will fight on your behalf and aggressively protect your rights.

Article provided by Roberts Law Group, PLLC
Visit us at www.robertslawteam.com

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SEX IN PUBLIC PLACES

How far does public sex go who gets away with it and who doesn’t?

Stories by people who have watched and lived and now write about their own experiences.

Theaters that allow people to have sex with one another...pay ten dollars and have sex right there in front of everyone. I wonder if I can go to a bar and have sex right there in the open? What’s the difference we all would be over 21?  

Will I get arrested? HOW DO THESE PLACES GET AWAY WITH SUCH ACTS AND NO ONE CARES but other people get arrested for the same sexual acts in similar places. Why do laws apply only to some? Why do law officials ignore blatant offenders and establishments that let these acts go on and make money from it?

Who is affected by this just the offenders or is it their family spouses kids. Is this one of the ways AIDS gets passed on and people just continue to lie about their activities?  

 JUST THINK OUR CHILDREN'S COULD BE AT RISK

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New Jersey Man Sentenced for Cyberstalking

Department of Justice Press Release
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For Immediate Release
January 18, 2011
United States Attorney's Office Eastern District of Pennsylvania
Contact: (215) 861-8200

New Jersey Man Sentenced for Cyberstalking

PHILADELPHIA—Matthew Bean, 20, of Bergenfield, New Jersey, was sentenced today to 45 days in prison and five years probation for a case of cyberbullying that included sending sexually explicit photos of another person to that person's school on January 26, 2009 and posting them on his own online page. The defendant took part in a web chat about the victim and the photos that included references, by others, to shaming the victim into possibly committing suicide. Bean pleaded guilty to stalking on September 15, 2010.

In addition to the prison time, U.S. District Court Judge Anita Brody ordered Bean to post a message on the pertinent chat board to let people know that cyberbullying is a crime and that law enforcement will pursue those who commit it, serve five years of supervised release, and pay a fine of $2,000.

"Technology has created new avenues for crime including many that target or involve children," said Memeger. "Today's sentence sends a message that we take crimes like cyberbullying and cyberstalking very seriously. People who attempt to harm others using the internet cannot hide in cyber space. Law enforcement will find them and seek to hold them accountable."

"We cannot, in 2011, underestimate the impact of bullying when it is enhanced by cyber means. Gone are the days of the proverbial "playground bully," as that playground has now expanded exponentially via the Internet," said Special Agent-in-Charge George C. Venizelos of the Philadelphia Division of the FBI. "The relative perceived anonymity of the Internet appears to empower individuals to say and do things they would not do in person."

This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and was prosecuted by Assistant United States Attorney Michael L. Levy.

According to a report by the Office of Justice Program's Bureau of Justice Statistics, during a 12-month period, an estimated 3.4 million persons age 18 or older were victims of stalking. The study measured behaviors such as unwanted phone calls, sending unsolicited or unwanted letters or e-mails, following or spying on the victim, showing up at places without a legitimate reason, waiting at places for the victim, leaving unwanted items, presents or flowers and posting information or spreading rumors about the victim on the Internet, in a public place, or by word of mouth. Additional findings included that approximately one in four stalking victims reported some form of cyberstalking such as e-mail (83 percent); 30 percent of victims are stalked by a current or former intimate partner; females are nearly three times more likely to be victims of this crime; and nearly three in four stalking victims knew the offender in some capacity.

President Obama designated January as National Stalking Awareness Month. The Department of Justice commemorated this designation today as a means to help raise awareness about the signs and consequences of this crime. Resources and information related to stalking awareness month are located at www.ovw.usdoj.gov and the Stalking Resource Center's National Stalking Awareness Month website at www.stalkingawarenessmonth.org.

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